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thee-a-word:

Greece from the air. AND, more importantly, our last EasyJet flight of the trip. These people are the devil. Cheap tickets… But you def get what you pay for.

I’m reblogging myself for several reasons:

1. June of last year I went to Europe with 2 of my siblings. Now that summer is heating up in PA, I am constantly thinking about my hot and humid adventures in Italy, Greece and Spain. 

2. I’m ready to go back.

3. I’m feeling lazy. 

4. I’m in a constant state of nostalgia. 

Source: thee-a-word
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St. Cajetan, Patron Saint of Job Hunters & Gambling Addicts
Today, these 2 go hand-in-hand: my job hunt is a gamble. AWESOME. 

St. Cajetan, Patron Saint of Job Hunters & Gambling Addicts

Today, these 2 go hand-in-hand: my job hunt is a gamble. AWESOME. 

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Job hunting has been the topic of conversation in my home for about 6 months now. I’d say 80% of my husband’s and my chats focus on job postings, resumes, grammar in cover letters, connections & networking, and emails and/or phone calls we’ve received. 

It’s SUPER depressing. 
Nothing delivers a blow to your self-esteem like sending out 3 dozen job applications, and hearing back from not a single one. 

This is where St. Cajetan comes in.

St. Cajetan has a resume that would make the most experience & best paid professional jealous:

Education:

Graduated from University of Padua with doctorates in Civil and Canon law. 

Work Experience:

Senator of Vicenza, Italy
Appointed a protonotary in Rome by Pope Julius II
Ordained in 1516
Joined the Oratory of St. Jerome: worked with the sick, focusing on the incurable
Founded a similar Oratory in Verona, Italy
Founded Theatines, an institute of clergy devoted to reforming the Church in 1523
Founded the Montes Pietatis to help extend loans to the poor

His references would include:

Pope Julius II
Pope Paul IV
Pope Clement VII
Bl. John Marinoni

As you can see, St. Cajetan spent his life working hard not only for the Church, but also the poor and sick. This might explain why he is the Patron Saint of Job Seekers - he understands what’s it’s like to leave one job and transition into a new one. He is also the Patron Saint of the unemployed, gamblers, and is invoke for good fortune. Now, all I need is a job so I can start developing a career/resume that St. Cajetan would be proud of.

St. Cajetan, pray for me so that I might find the perfect job. So that I might write inspired cover letters, catch all of the typos in my resume, and connect with an employer that will offer me work that will bring me closer to God. St. Cajetan, pray that I might emulate your work ethic and honor Christ through my career.

St. Cajetan, pray for us!
 

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St. Expeditus: Patron Saint for the Impatient.
CAN’T YOU TYPE THAT NAME ANY FASTER!?!??!?!

St. Expeditus: Patron Saint for the Impatient.

CAN’T YOU TYPE THAT NAME ANY FASTER!?!??!?!

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I want everything NOW. I use social media to connect with my friends NOW. I use email to contact others NOW. I use Netflix & Hulu+ & OnDemand cable to watch what I want to see NOW. Not only do I not want to wait, but most of the time, I don’t need to. 

I’ve been waiting for almost a month to hear back about a job I applied to. The wait has been causing me all sorts of anxiety, so I decided to Google “Patron Saint for the Impatient”. St. Expeditus popped up - ha, he (and Google) didn’t make me wait for that.

St. Expeditus is one of those Saints known only in legends. As the legend goes, relics of Martyrs in Rome were being sent to a convent in Paris. It is thought that the recipients of the relics mistook the word “expedito” on the crate for the name of the Saint - and so St. Expeditus’s legend began. 

All we know for sure is that St. Expeditus was a Martyr who died for his faith in Christ. AND that Catholics across Europe have turned to him for help in expediting matters and to avoid procrastination since the mid-18th century. 

Today, I’m asking St. Expeditus to pray for me so that I might find patience and calm in my job search. That I might do my best to find the perfect job, but have faith and trust in God’s plan for me and my career. St. Expeditus, pray for me to chill out! 

In our intense & hurried & got-to-have-it-now world, we could all use a little help from St. Expeditus.

St. Expeditus, pray for us!

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Patron Saint of Agreeing-to-Disagree
(but srsly, I’m right)

Patron Saint of Agreeing-to-Disagree

(but srsly, I’m right)

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If you know me at all (even just via the interwebz) you know that I have a hard time admitting when I’m wrong. I can be straight-up stubborn to the point of annoying even myself. So, I’ll be the first to admit, it’s incredibly hard not only agreeing to disagree, but also letting go and forgetting about the disagreement at all. 

St. Polycarp has been there, done that. 

St. Polycarp (who was taught by St. John the Evangelist himself) was a great, early leader in the Church. Toward the end of his life, St. Polycarp went to visit Pope Anicetus in Rome as a Representative of the Asiatic Churches. 
The Eastern and Western Churches could not agree on a date for Easter.
After a lot of back-and-forth, Pope Anicetus and St. Polycarp agreed to disagree, and allowed location traditions to dictate when Easter should be celebrated (as it still is today).   

Now, if only I could have the Grace and wisdom St. Polycarp had.

Today (like most days) I’m asking St. Polycarp to pray for me so that I might loosen my death-grip on my many strong opinions. That I might walk away from arguments in peace, not fight for the last word & stay level-headed.

And oh man, do I need all the help I can get.  

St. Polycarp, pray for us!

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According to legend, St. George:
1. Slayed a dragon
2. married a princess
3. baptized an entire village
If that’s not badass, idk what is. 

According to legend, St. George:

1. Slayed a dragon

2. married a princess

3. baptized an entire village

If that’s not badass, idk what is. 

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What better way to start March (& kick off my posting here) than the tale of St. George. And what a tale it is…

St. George’s legend first appeared in the 6th century. According to this legend, St. George was a knight out looking for adventure when he came  upon the village of Sylene in Libya. It just so happens that Sylene was suffering from a pesky dragon problem. The villagers first fed the dragon sheep. When the sheep ran out, lovely maidens drew lots and the losers faced the dragon with nothing but their looks to save them (note: their looks did very little to save them).
The day St. George arrived, the king’s daughter was being led off to appease the dragon. 

St. George slayed the dragon. 
&
Married the princess.
&
Baptized the entire village.

Pretty X-treme? Right? Right. 

In reality, St. George (most likely) suffered martyrdom in Palestine sometime around the reign of Emperor Constantine. 

But the dragon slaying is much more interesting… 
There’s a lesson here: 

It’s soooooo easy to lose focus on the present - no matter how dull and/or stressful and/or annoying it may be. Sometimes we’d all rather get lost in our daydreams (and/or let ourselves get distracted by unimportant stuff) than finish work or deal with our many other “real world” issues. 

St. George may not have really slayed a dragon, but he did die for Christ. Sure, it didn’t involve a mythical creature, but it was still pretty awesome.

So, today, I’m asking St. George to pray for me, so that I might focus on what’s really important in my life and stop getting distracted by the silly, unimportant stuff constantly waddling through my head. That I might appreciate my wonderful realty and honor Christ in every act - even if I’m not slaying dragons.

St. George, pray for us!

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Ora Pro Nobis means Pray for us in Latin, fyi. 

I love the Saints.  


(http://catholicmemes.tumblr.com)

It’s not worship, duh. We all pray for  people we love, don’t we? And we sometimes ask others to pray for us, right? This is the same thing. BUT by asking the Saints to intercede on our behalf, we’re asking very holy people to help us out. 

The Saints were once normal people with average problems (for the most part) but who led extraordinary lives for Christ. They know what it’s like to live on earth, struggle at work, suffer through tough relationships, get sick, be homeless, and sometimes fail.

They know that feel, bro.
And they totally want to help us out.

They are the people we can turn to for advice, for intercession, and for good examples of ways to lead our lives. 

They are also all pretty freakin’ awesome. 

If you ask me.

So, ch-ch-ch-check back here to learn more about the Saints and to find a Saint specific to your needs, troubles, personality.